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Cornell Plant Varieties


Cornell Universityís College of Agriculture & Life Sciences has a long and productive history as a institution known for successfully introducing novel plant varieties with improved disease and insect resistance and cold tolerance to the public, including:


For more information on Cornell Plant Varieties, please contact Jessica Lyga at JML73@cornell.edu.




Apple Rootstocks

  1. The joint Cornell University and United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) Apple Rootstock Breeding and Evaluation Program develops new rootstock cultivars with an emphasis on ease of nursery propagation, fireblight resistance, tolerance to extreme temperatures, resistance to the soil pathogens of the sub-temperate regions of the US, and tolerance to apple replant disorder.


    GENEVA® 'G.11' >> GENEVA® 'G.16' >> GENEVA® 'G.30' >> GENEVA® 'G.41' >> GENEVA® 'G.65' >> GENEVA® 'G.202' >> GENEVA® 'G.210' >> GENEVA® 'G.214' >> GENEVA® 'G.222' >> GENEVA® 'G.890' >> GENEVA® 'G.935' >> GENEVA® 'G.969' >>

    GENEVA® Apple Rootstock Comparison Chart

Apples

  1. The apple breeding program develops fruit with characteristics including: greater quality (including high vitamin C content), better storage and shelf life, reduced dependence on chemical control of insects and diseases.


    'Fortune' >>

Cherries

  1. The stone fruit breeding program selected for qualities to improve: flavor, insect and disease resistance, cold tolerance, and reduced cracking.


    Sweet

    'Hartland' >> 'Royalton' >>


Corn

  1. The research in the corn breeding program is primarily on field corn with some work on sweet corn. The goals are to introduce new cultivars and germplasm having adaptations for use in sustainable production systems including organic production. The program emphasizes breeding for improved yield, insect and disease resistance, cold and drought tolerance.


    Organic Double Cross D2901 >>

Grapes

  1. Since 1888, Cornell viticulturists have introduced more than 45 new table, juice, and wine grape varieties adapted to cool-climate growing regions. Cornell University offers research and educational facilities that positively impact not only local winery businesses and tourism, but also present the world with novel varieties that can provide a sustainable future.


    Red Wine

    'Arandell' >> 'Corot noir' >> 'Geneva Red' >> 'Noiret' >>

    White Wine

    'Aromella' >> 'Traminette' >> 'Valvin Muscat' >>

    White Table

    'Marquis' >>

    Cornell Grape Varieties Comparison Chart

    Buy wine made from Cornell™ Grapes

    Buy 'Arandell' Posters

    Buy 'Aromella' Posters

    Buy Cornell™ Grape Postcards


    *Note: A portion of the profits from poster and postcard sales will benefit Cornell's grape breeding program.

Melons

  1. The cucurbit breeding program has developed varieties and lines that were selected based upon the following qualities: improved flavor, high nutrition content, production quality, disease and insect resistance, as well as, novel traits.


    Honeydew

    'Farmer's Daughter' >>

    Click the image to the right to view a poster of 'Farmer's Daughter'.

Ornamentals

  1. The ornamental varieties are a new frontier for Cornellís Horticulture Department. The varieties were chosen for characteristics including: unique and unusual leaf and flower colors, insect and disease resistance, as well as, cold tolerance.


    Alstroemeria 'Mauve Majesty' >> Alstroemeria 'Tangerine Tango' >>

Peppers

  1. The pepper breeding program has developed varieties and lines that were selected based upon the following qualities: improved flavor, high nutrition content, production quality, disease and insect resistance, as well as, novel traits.


    'Peacework' >>

Plums

  1. The stone fruit breeding program selected for qualities to improve: flavor, insect and disease resistance, and cold tolerance.


    'Castleton' >>

Potatoes

  1. Cornellís potato breeding program centers around the genetic improvement of potato, both by conventional and molecular means. The highest breeding priority is to develop agronomically-acceptable varieties that are resistant to the golden nematode. It aims to develop new chipping and tablestock varieties that are adapted to the Northeast, and to meet ever-changing needs of the regional potato industry.


    White Skin White Flesh

    'Lamoka' >> 'Marcy' >> 'Waneta' >>

    Red Skin White Flesh

    'Red Maria' >>

    Pink Skin White Flesh

    'Strawberry Paw' >>


    Cornell Potato Varieties Comparison Chart


    Uihlein Farm of Cornell University is the official seed potato farm in New York State. This facility is used to develop disease-free nuclear seed stocks through pathogen-testing of seed originating from tissue cultured plantlets.

Raspberries

  1. The primary goal of the small fruit breeding program is to develop improved berry varieties with disease and insect resistance, and fruit quality by traditional breeding practices.


    Red

    'Crimson Giant' >> 'Crimson Night' >> 'Encore' >> 'Prelude' >>

    Golden Blush

    'Double Gold' >>

Squash

  1. The cucurbit breeding program has developed varieties and lines that were selected based upon the following qualities: improved flavor, high nutrition content, production quality, disease and insect resistance, as well as, novel traits.


    Butternut

    'Amber Delight' >>

Strawberries

  1. The primary goal of the small fruit breeding program is to develop improved berry varieties with disease and insect resistance, and fruit quality by traditional breeding practices.


    'Clancy' >> 'Herriot' >> 'L'Amour' >>

    Cornell Strawberry Varieties Comparison Chart

Wheat

  1. Wheat research began in the fall of 1907. The goals of the wheat breeding program are to introduce new cultivars and germplasm having improved yield, nutritional quality, disease resistance, and other characteristics that increase the crop value and production efficiency.


    Soft White Winter Wheat

    'Bridgeport' >> 'Hopkins' >> 'Jensen' >> 'Medina' >> 'Richland' >> 'Saranac' >>

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