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Startup Technologies

These selected technologies have excellent potential to be the basis for new business ventures. Several Cornell technologies already form the basis of over 70 active new businesses based on licensed Cornell technologies.


To search and browse all available Cornell technologies, click here.


To view featured technologies that demonstrate the breadth and depth of Cornell innovation, see our featured technologies web page.


Body Shape Analysis & Automated Custom Fit Patternmaking

  1. Technology Overview:

    This technology enables a reliable system and method for custom pattern development for garments that can revolutionize the apparel industry, which relies on customization systems based on 19thcentury technology.

    Based on 3D body scanning data and statistical analysis methods, this method uses multiple 3D measurements to categorize silhouette and profile views of the body simultaneously. The analysis can be utilized to classify body shapes of particular target markets, different ages, sexes, or ethnicities. A system that directly links the 3D body measurement analysis to 2D garment patterns is also introduced.


    Potential Commercial Applications:

    • Clothing or shoe manufacturing targeting certain body or foot shapes, or offering customized choices based on shape classification.

    Click here for a brief technology summary.

    Click here for a business overview.


    Contact Martin Teschl, mt439@cornell.edu, 607-254-4454

Capillarity-based Switchable Adhesion Device

  1. Technology Overview:

    A switchable adhesion device inspired by the adhesion abilities of the leaf beetle was developed based on liquid surface tension forces. The device uses a large number of very small liquid bridges that can be instantly switched on or off, grabbing and releasing an object. The adhesive force of the liquid is proportional with the number of individual contacts, so scaling these contacts down allows more contacts and thereby a greater overall adhesive force, all within a compact design. Additionally, both grabbed and released configurations are stable equilibrium states that can be maintained without energy addition. Hence, only minimal energy is required for switching between states. A truly unique technology, the device will open new possibilities over an enormous range of fields from research and defense to medicine and consumer products.


    Potential Commercial Applications:
    Load-bearing applications, such as:

    • temporary wall or windshield mounts
    • "spiderman"gloves
    • wafer handling
    • pick-and-place applications, e.g., in manufacturing

    Click here for a brief technology summary.

    Click here for a business overview.


    Contact Martin Teschl, mt439@cornell.edu, 607-254-4454

Novel Polymers for Wound and Surgical Adhesives

  1. Technology Overview:

    This novel polymer represents a significant advance in synthetic, biodegradable and biocompatible polymeric biomaterials for use in surgery and wound-closure and healing. The new biomaterial is a synthetic polymer consisting of polyethylene glycol and a polycarbonate of dihydroxyacetone ("MPEG-pDHA"). DHA is natural-produced in the human glucose metabolism, which means that the breakdown products of MPEG-pDHA will be effectively incorporated into normal cellular processes.

    The inventors have shown in rats that the polymers are effective in helping closing gaps following surgical tissue removal, preventing the formation of seromas, hollow pockets in the body that fill with serous fluid which require drainage. It's also demonstrated in rats that the polymers are effective as a rapid, resorbable, internal hemostatic agent to control blood loss, with potential applications in laparoscopic surgery and trauma.


    Potential Commercial Applications:

    • In surgery, to prevent or treat seroma.
    • In emergency medicine and in surgery, to achieve hemostasis.
    • In surgery, to prevent or treat tissue adhesion.

    Click here for a brief technology summary.

    Click here for a business overview.


    Contact Alice Li, Ph.D., xl11@cornell.edu, 607-254-4487

Peel-able Array for Affinity-based Separation of Biomaterials

  1. Technology Overview:

    A method of using an array of parylene-based "peel-able" strips to screen and capture aptamers (or other biomaterial) from a mixture onto specific proteins immobilized on the strips, and subsequently isolate and recover each separated aptamer of interest by simply peeling off each strip

    Microarrays are affinity-based assays that allow for massively parallel screening of candidate biomolecules in a library. However, it remains a challenge to reliably isolate and recover multiple biomolecular species. Cornell researchers have come up with a method of using an array of parylene-based "peel-able" strips (Peel-Strips) to screen and capture aptamers (or other biomaterial) from a mixture onto specific proteins immobilized on the Peel-Strips, and subsequently isolate and recover each separated aptamer of interest by simply peeling off each strip. The novel technique is based on a polymer layer that is functionalized to enable the immobilization of any protein/DNA. By integration with microfluidic structures, a microarray format was created that allows for parallel screening/capture of multiple biomolecular interactions and subsequent separation and recovery of the species of interest.


    Potential Commercial Applications:

    • Screening and recovery of protein-protein, protein-cells interactions, and nucleic acids hybridization and even stem cells, pluripotent stem cells
    • Drug screening
    • Platform for cataloging and storage

    Click here for a brief technology summary.

    Click here for a business overview.


    Contact Martin Teschl, mt439@cornell.edu, 607-254-4454

Pseudo 3-D CMOS Imager Built Using Integrated Diffraction Gratings

  1. Technology Overview:

    This invention describes a method for building an image sensor (imager) on a CMOS chip that extracts the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of the light source it is imaging. Each pixel in the imager can detect both the intensity and incident angle of the light received by it through interference patterns. The imager is lens-less with photodiodes distributed in a pattern such that their relative illumination may provide spatial information about the source light striking each unit cell.

    A major standout of this invention is that the interference patterns can be created from incoherent (imaged) light as present in nature, rather than from coherent "in-phase" light used in constructing holographic images. Another unique aspect is that the diffraction gratings can be manufactured with standard micro-fabrication techniques, allowing the complete integration of the apparatus within a CMOS chip.


    Potential Commercial Applications:

    • Biomedical applications, such as locating individual fluorescent cells in a given piece of tissue by detecting the incident angle of light each cell illuminates through a combination of many such imagers in an array
    • Security applications, such as reconstruction of the 3-D structure of objects for 3-D modeling or facial recognition

    Click here for a brief technology summary.

    Click here for a business overview.


    Contact Martin Teschl, mt439@cornell.edu, 607-254-4454

Silicon Resonator with High Q Factor and High Frequency

  1. Technology Overview:

    This robust invention requires only a homogeneous single-crystalline device, allowing for the design of CMOS-compatible MEMS resonators with quality (Q) factors approaching the intrinsic Q factor of silicon.

    This offers a great advantage over current air-gap resonators, which have a high Q factor but also high motional impedance. Efforts to reduce the motional impedance have included the use of piezoelectric materials and internal dielectric transduction, however both require a composite structure incompatible with CMOS and result in lower Q factors due to material interface losses.


    Potential Commercial Applications:

    • CMOS chip-based devices, such as
      • RF MEMS oscillators
      • clock generators
      • High Q applications, e.g.
    • chip-scale mechanical spectrum analyzers
    • narrow-band RF

    Click here for a brief technology summary.

    Click here for a business overview.


    Contact Bethany Koi, ck574@cornell.edu, 607-254-2330

Treatment or Prevention of Cancer with Sirt2 and Sirt5 Modulators

  1. Technology Overview:

    Cornell researchers present novel approaches to combating several types of cancer using modulators of human sirtuins 2 and 5 (Sirt2 and Sirt5). The approaches described herein utilize novel functions of Sirt2 and Sirt5 discovered by the inventors. Inhibitors that selectively target Sirt2 and Sirt5 have been identified, and some of them have been shown to be able to control cancer cell proliferation.


    Potential Commercial Applications:

    • Sirt2 inhibitors as anti-cancer drug candidates
    • Sirt5 inhibitors as anti-cancer drug candidates

    Click here for a brief technology summary.

    Click here for a business overview.


    Contact Alice Li, Ph.D., xl11@cornell.edu, 607-254-4487